Wittgenstein found Freud both alluring and misleading and credited him with having produced 'a very powerful mythology.'.

Author:Neuhaus, Richard John
Position:While We're At It - Ludwig Wittgenstein
 
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Wittgenstein found Freud both alluring and misleading and credited him with having produced "a very powerful mythology." Auden said, "He would have us remember to be enthusiastic over the night." Edmundson writes, "Freud's thinking moved backward into the dark past--rather than forward into the highly reasoned future." He was enamored of pagan rituals, superstitions, and black magic. And, of course, the ancient Egyptian rites were key to his debunking of the founding biblical story in Moses and Monotheism. Freud was anything but a modern Enlightenment rationalist. It is commonly said that the three great modern masters of suspicion are Darwin, Marx, and Freud, each exposing that the world is not what it seems to be, and certainly not what the Christian West mistook for reality. Like Darwin and Marx, Freud claimed to be a scientist, and desperately wanted to be recognized as such, but constructed his supposed science on prescientific and even antiscientific foundations. Contradictions abounded. Carl Jung, among the more prominent of the disciples with whom he broke, was sympathetic to the Nazi takeover and developed theories about the singularity of the Aryan psyche. "The Aryan unconscious," wrote Jung, "has a higher potential than the Jewish; that is the advantage and the disadvantage of a youthfulness not yet fully estranged from barbarism." Thus did he...

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