Tips for NFP internal reports.

Author:Thomas, Sibi
Position::Not for profit
 
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A not-for-profit should consider the following best practices to ensure that internal financial reports prepared for its board of directors and other governance committees are accurate, timely, and decision-useful.

Make it easy to read. Internal financial statements that include management's discussion and analysis of the results presented can be helpful to board members as they carry out their oversight responsibilities. A brief overview of the period presented and highlights of the results that are meaningful to the organization will assist the governing bodies in their decision-making processes. The analysis should be easy to read, avoiding overly technical language while conveying the organization's financial story. In addition, the accompanying financial statements should include, at a minimum, comparative statements of financial position (balance sheet), statements of activities (income statement), and budget-to-actual report.

Describe profit and loss by program.

Not-for-profits operating multiple programs (especially those relying on governmental funding) should also consider, as a best practice, producing a profit and loss statement for each program on at least a quarterly basis. The surplus or loss on each program should be compared with the surplus or loss of the corresponding period in the previous year with significant variances explained. As an additional best practice, on an annual basis, a reconciliation should be prepared between the budgeted surplus (or loss) to the surplus (or loss) from the audited financial statements. If a program is regularly operating at a loss, management and the board can evaluate whether the organization should continue to subsidize the program.

Use ratio analysis. Ratio analysis is an effective tool for assessing an organization's financial viability. When produced on at least a semiannual basis, internal reports on key ratios can help organizations monitor their liquidity, performance, activity, and leverage. The ratios can...

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