The Politics of Love in Myanmar: LGBT Mobilization and Human Rights as a Way of Life. By Lynette Chua. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2019.

DOIhttp://doi.org/10.1111/lasr.12430
Published date01 September 2019
Date01 September 2019
society nexus, it challenges us to incorporate greater complexity
and nonlinearity into our understanding of how broader societal
forces interact to deter or cascade crime, war, and peace. Ulti-
mately, this book goes a long way to building an evidence base that
can inform those who do value peacebuilding to do it better, and
perhaps persuade those who are critical of the peacebuilding
agenda to concede its potential. How the authors refine the cascade
propositions over the following decade will be readily anticipated.
References
Gladwell, Malcolm (2000) The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference.
New York: Little, Brown & Co.
Picketty, Thomas (2014) Capital in the Twenty-First Century. Cambridge, MA: The
Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
Sikkink, Kathryn (2011) The Justice Cascade: How Human Rights Prosecutions Are Chang-
ing World Politics.New York: W. W. Norton & Co.
***
The Politics of Love in Myanmar: LGBT Mobilization and Human
Rights as a Way of Life. By Lynette Chua. Stanford: Stanford
University Press, 2019.
Reviewed by Lilianna Deveneau, Department of Sociology, George
Mason University
Human rights violations in Myanmar, formerly Burma, have been
globally scrutinized, including imprisonment of state political oppo-
nents, systemic rape of ethnic minorities, unlawful capture and kill-
ing, and forced labor and relocation (253). With a history
entrenched in violence and suppression, even speaking of human
rights was unlawful until the political reformation of 2011 relaxed
some social control (237). Additionally, religious beliefs paint lesbian,
gay, bisexual, trangender (LGBT) people as immoral and eternally
damned (Christianity) or embodying punishment for bad karma in
past lives (seen in Burmese Buddhism) (280). Discrimination is
upheld in legal institutions (e.g., the criminalization of same-sex sex-
ual relations), by employers and educators, and cultural norms and
behaviors such as frequent bullying and sexual assault (280). This
social disgust has been internalized to produced self-hatred, fear,
and shame; the LGBT human rights movement was tasked with
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