THE CONVERSATION.

 
FREE EXCERPT

A MOMENT OF HOPE INNOCENCE LOST

It is very sad to realize the loss of innocence we are experiencing now with our current political environment in the U.S. and in Israel. In "From the Editor" (Spring 2019), Nadine Epstein expressed great disappointment in the tone of letters the magazine is receiving, and this saddens me, too. Moment's carefully constructed issues always offer a great array of opinions and civility to readers, particularly at a time when Jews are struggling with such large issues.

Moment still offers hope. Thank you for that.

Linda Gallanter

San Francisco, CA

NOT ONE-SIDED

My wife subscribed to Moment last year, but I'm the one who is really reading it. I love this magazine! I truly do not understand why there are people who think you're way too one-sided. I find all of your articles thoughtful, articulate, nuanced and full of content that really makes me think. I read everything, cover-to-cover, and I plan on re-subscribing every year. Thank you.

Daniel Schlossberg

Cleveland Heights, OH

GEORGE SOROS

A THREAT TO ISRAEL

By casting the issue as the vilification of George Soros ("Soros: A Small Sacrifice for Netanyahu," Spring 2019), Moment misses the broader story: the vilification of Israel by post-nationalist forces in Western Europe and the United States. This, and not "Adelson donates more" comparisons, is the context within which readers should evaluate Soros's funding of self-proclaimed civil society organizations within Israel and throughout the West.

Viewed through this lens, the assertion that Israel's proposed NGO law targeted organizations "out of sync with government policy," or the unchallenged remark of Soros's handler that the financier "challenged oppressive powers to support the underdog," elide the more complicated, more urgent and ultimately far more interesting issue of how Jewish nationalism adapts to a globalizing world. How should Israel defend itself against the ideological onslaught of those who--under the guise of developing civil society--invest Palestinians with unique symbolic value, and whose warnings of rabid nationalism begin and end with Zionism?

Soros is certainly correct that excessive nationalism can pose a genuine and at times even lethal threat to minority rights. But a more forthright and detailed exploration of what civil society advocacy--whether in Tel Aviv or on many American university campuses--can mean when it comes to Israel would have lent nuance to your discussion of George...

To continue reading

FREE SIGN UP