The BS at CBS.

Author:Tahmincioglu, Eve
Position:EDITOR'S NOTE
 
FREE EXCERPT

"I don't care if 30 more women come forward and allege this kind of stuff. Les is our leader and it wouldn't change my opinion of him."

Those words were attributed to long-time CBS director Arnold Kopelson in a New York Times article published on Sept. 12. He was speaking about the company's CEO, Leslie Mooves, who was eventually ousted from the company last month under the shadow ow mounting sexual harassment allegations, including assault.

No one at CBS returned a request by Directors & Boards to find out if Kopelson actually made the statement, but given the revelations about the hostile environment at the company that spanned years, it's not impossible to think someone in power at the media company uttered such words.

Not surprisingly, Kopelson was among the five directors who CBS announced were stepping down from the board following Mooves' departure.

I read Kopelson's alleged statements several times when I first read the article. My reaction was shock at first, then anger.

The company also announced, "Moonves and CBS will donate $20 million to one or more organizations that support the #MeToo movement and equality for women in the workplace."

It's a nice sentiment, but the problems with women's equality in corporate America run deeper than $20 million can root out. If 30 women can't convince one entrenched male director that he should do his job and make sure the CEO he oversees has the utmost integrity, can you imagine what it's like to be the lone female director in a boardroom?

This kind of bias is exactly why a bigger...

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