Recognizing the Need to Recognize: A Proposed Foreign Judgment Recognition Statute and a Procedure for Enforcement in Louisiana

AuthorElias M. Medina
PositionJ.D. 2020, Paul M. Hebert Law Center, Louisiana State University
Pages917-961
Louisiana Law Review Louisiana Law Review
Volume 80
Number 3
Spring 2020
Article 12
9-15-2020
Recognizing the Need to Recognize: A Proposed Foreign Recognizing the Need to Recognize: A Proposed Foreign
Judgment Recognition Statute and a Procedure for Enforcement Judgment Recognition Statute and a Procedure for Enforcement
in Louisiana in Louisiana
Elias M. Medina
Follow this and additional works at: https://digitalcommons.law.lsu.edu/lalrev
Part of the Law Commons
Repository Citation Repository Citation
Elias M. Medina,
Recognizing the Need to Recognize: A Proposed Foreign Judgment Recognition Statute
and a Procedure for Enforcement in Louisiana
, 80 La. L. Rev. (2020)
Available at: https://digitalcommons.law.lsu.edu/lalrev/vol80/iss3/12
This Comment is brought to you for free and open access by the Law Reviews and Journals at LSU Law Digital
Commons. It has been accepted for inclusion in Louisiana Law Review by an authorized editor of LSU Law Digital
Commons. For more information, please contact kreed25@lsu.edu.
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Recognizing the Need to Recognize: A Proposed
Foreign Judgment Recognition Statute and a
Procedure for Enforcement in Louisiana
Elias M. Medina*
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction.................................................................................. 916
I. Developing a Recognition Framework:
Frankenstein’s Monster of Piecemeal State Law ......................... 921
A. The Origins of Comity........................................................... 922
B. Recognition and Enforcement as a State
Responsibility ........................................................................ 924
C. Uniform Acts for Foreign Judgment Recognition and
Enforcement........................................................................... 927
II. The Enforceability of Foreign Judgments in Louisiana ............... 930
A. Louisiana Circuit Split........................................................... 930
B. Statutory Interpretation.......................................................... 932
III. Key Issues in Statutory Foreign Judgment and
Enforcement Law ......................................................................... 935
A. Full Faith and Credit.............................................................. 935
B. Bases for Recognition in the Recognition Acts
and the Restatement............................................................... 937
1. Finality of Judgment ....................................................... 938
2. Jurisdiction ...................................................................... 939
3. Impartial Tribunals..........................................................940
C. Reciprocity............................................................................. 940
IV. A Statute Is Suitable for Louisiana’s
Mixed-Jurisdiction Status............................................................. 942
A. Louisiana’s Mixed-Jurisdiction Legal Tradition ................... 943
Copyright 2020, by ELIAS M. MEDINA.
* J.D. 2020, Paul M. Hebert Law Center, Louisiana State University. This
Comment is dedicated to Rachel Jarrell. Thanks to Professors Keith Hall and
Marlene Krousel for thoughtful notes throughout the writing process, and to
James Shelledy, friend and mentor, for consistently pushing me to think critically
and creatively.
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916 LOUISIANA LAW REVIEW [Vol. 80
B. Louisiana’s Statute Must Consider Full Faith and
Credit Implications ................................................................ 946
C. The Statute’s Rationale—What Law and Why...................... 948
1. Full Faith and Credit ....................................................... 949
2. The 2005 Recognition Statute Is Ideal
for Louisiana ................................................................... 950
3. Necessary Amendments to Adopt the 2005
Recognition Act .............................................................. 952
a. Interplay Among the Code of Civil Procedure,
the 2005 Recognition Act, and the EFJA ................. 952
b. Full Faith and Credit for Sister-Recognized
Judgments Pursuant to the EFJA .............................. 955
Conclusion.................................................................................... 957
INTRODUCTION
In today’s global economy, parties are increasingly dependent on
international trade.1 This increase in trade has spurred transnational
litigation, ranging from Nicaraguan banana workers suing Dole in the
United States2 to a United States branch of a United Kingdom-based
corporation suing a Saudi Arabian corporation in the Kingdom of
Bahrain.3 In the latter case, the plaintiff successfully obtained
recognitionthe act of adopting another court’s judgmentof the
Bahraini judgment in a New York state court.4 The plaintiff then attempted
to enforce the New York judgment in District of Columbia and
1. Rapture Shipping, Ltd. v. Allround Fuel Trading B.V., 350 F. Supp. 2d
369, 373 (S.D.N.Y. 2004) (“The importance of extending comity . . . has only
increased as our economy has become increasingly global and dependent upon
international commerce.”).
2. First Amended Complaint, Tellez v. Dole Food Co., No. BC312852, 2004
WL 5468592 (Cal. Super. Ct. L.A. Cnty. Sept 7, 2004). For a discussion of the
Dole litigation saga, see Armin Rosencranz & Stephen Roblin, Tellez v. Dole:
Nicaraguan Banana Workers Confront the U.S. Judicial System, 7 GOLDEN GAT E
U. ENVTL. L.J. 113 (2014).
3. Standard Chartered Bank v. Ahmad Hamad Al Gosaibi & Bros. Co., 957
N.Y.S.2d 602 (Sup. Ct. 2012).
4. Id.

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