A Well-Paid Slave: Curt Flood's Fight for Free Agency in Professional Sports.

Author:Lindsey, Fred
Position:Book review
 
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A Well-Paid Slave: Curt Flood's Fight for Free Agency in Professional Sports By Brad Snyder Viking, October 2006 $25.95, ISBN 0-670-03794-X

No matter how history night judge former major league baseball star Curt Flood, most serious baseball fans would argue that he deserves considerable recognition for his pioneering spirit. In Brad Snyder's A Well-Paid Slave: Curt Flood's Fight for Free Agency in Professional Sports, the writer mainly discusses Flood's trials, tribulations, travails and trade-offs, and his giant step in making sports history.

Flood was a skillful baseball player, known more for his defensive flair, even though he batted more than 300 six times in during his 15-year career. He played with the Cincinnati Reds, the St. Louis Cardinals and a brief stint with the Washington Senators. He was a significant contributor to three pennant-winning Cardinal teams, and he was also a three-time all-star. But Flood became more famous for paving the way for "free agency" in major league baseball, a vehicle that made millionaires out of once very ordinary major league baseball players.

At the end of the 1970 season, another productive year, Flood was traded to the Philadelphia Phillies. Yet he refused to go for several reasons: One was that he thought Philadelphia was a racist city; and another was that he had a productive business in St. Louis that needed his attention. Flood filed a lawsuit against Major League Baseball. The suit charged the organization with violating antitrust laws and suggested that the perpetual reserve clause in players' contracts...

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