2006 national book awards.

The winner in each category is selected by a panel of judges; the awards were announced on November 15.

Fiction

WINNER

THE ECHO MAKER | RICHARD POWERS: During the spectacular annual crane migration in Nebraska, a man enters a coma from a car accident. When he awakens with mixed intellectual and visual signals, he tries to understand the origin of the accident.

(GOOD/EXCELLENT Jan/Feb 2007)

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"Powers has taken a straightforward medical-suspense narrative and used it as the scaffolding for a book about perception, memory, hope, and that nebulous thing we call the soul." GAIL CALDWELL, BOSTON GLOBE

ONLY REVOLUTIONS | MARK Z. DANIELEWSKI: Sam and Hailey, 16-year-old lovers, present their stories from opposite sides of the page, literally.

(EXCELLENT SELECTION Jan/Feb 2007)

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"Danielewski's intention simply may be to illuminate the limits to which the novel can be stretched, the many different ways a book can now be read." DEBORAH VANKIN, LOS ANGELES TIMES

A DISORDER PECULIAR TO THE COUNTRY | KEN KALFUS: A narcissistic couple are engaged in a hostile divorce fight, and each hopes that the other has died in 9/11.

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"The boldly original premise with which this exceptionally smart, provocative novel begins isn't going to sit well with some readers." JONATHAN YARDLEY, WASHINGTON POST

EAT THE DOCUMENT | DANA SPIOTTA: When a 1970s radical goes underground and emerges three decades later, she must address the consequences of her actions.

(GOOD May/June 2006)

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"Eat the Document is fragmentary, smart and beautiful, and it brilliantly contrasts nascent and mature postmodernity through the lens of culture/counterculture." SARAH CYPHER, OREGONIAN

THE ZERO | JESS WALTER: Soon after 9/11, New York City cop Brian Remy accidentally shoots himself in the head, becomes involved in an evil government plot, and deals with his teenage son.

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"The best of The Zero breathes life into the author's idea of post-9/11 life as a fever dream for its characters ... [and] wonders why that dream is so enveloping." JANET MASLIN, NEW YORK TIMES

Nonfiction

WINNER

THE WORST HARD TIME The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl | TIMOTHY EGAN: In 1935, America's High Plains turned to dust, setting in motion a vast human and environmental catastrophe. Egan puts a human face on these events.

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(EXCELLENT SELECTION Mar/Apr 2006)

"Here...

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