Latino nonprofits.

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Stones by the Staff of Latino Leaders

Courtesy photos

There's no question that Latinos are making inroads everywhere.

But in business, perhaps where they are reaching the deepest fibers of society may be in nonprofit organizations. The special goals of these types of businesses make them unique. Here, we present three that are noteworthy. One of them, League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) already have legendary status. The other two, National Hispanic Media Coalition and Radio KDNA, are well on their way to being part of the history books.

Latino Leaders takes a look at these four special nonprofits.

THE REAL VOICE OF THE FARM WORKERS

Photo by Braulio Herrera of Braulio's Photography of Yakima, Wa (http://www.braulios.com/)

ON MAY 18, 1980 Mount St. Helens of Washington state erupted.

The blast, heard across many states, triggered the largest landslide In recorded history sent ash 1S miles up In the air, busting off 1, 300 feet off the volcano, leveling forests, melting ice and snow that provoking deadly landslides that killed 57 people.

The Yakima Valley, which is situated about 140 east of Seattle and sits In the breadbasket of the state, is currently home to over 240,000 people, with over 40 per cent of them Latino. Back in 1980, there were no Spanish-language media that informed local migrant workers, almost all from Mexico, except Radio KDNA, a small, non-profit station that had just been installed in the town of Granger, population just over 3,000.

Radio broadcasters, some of them formerly migrant farm workers, informed the Spanish-speaking population, telling them how to protect themselves from dangerous ashes, as the day turned dark from the debris.

Radio founder, Ricardo Garcia, a legend in the Yakima Valley for a life dedicated to helping Latinos in every conceivable way, retired after 26 years of heading the station. But Radio KDNA 91.9 FM, which is called "La voz del campesino" (The voice of the farm worker) remains a non-profit, giving local Latinos invaluable information that ranges from health care, voting rights and news, with top radio journalists like Francisco Rios, its news director, on top of the latest. With Rios at the helm, Radio KDNA persists as the top informative outlet for Hispanics and a true voice for local farmworkers.

FRANCISCO RIOS NEWS DIRECTOR OF RADIO KDNA, DELIVERS THE LATEST NEWS TO THE RESIDENTS OF THE YAKIMA VALLEY, IN WASHINGTON STATE.

VINTAGE NONPROFIT

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IT WAS BORN right...

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