Individualizing Justice for Offenders with Developmental Disabilities: A Descriptive Account of Nebraska's IJP Model

Date01 April 1986
Published date01 April 1986
DOI10.1177/003288558606600107
Subject MatterArticles
52
Individualizing
Justice for
Offenders
with
Developmental
Disabilities:
A
Descriptive
Account
of
Nebraska’s
IJP
Model
Jean
Morton,
DeAnn
Hughes,
and
Eric
Evans*
*Jean
Morton
is
project
director,
"Offenders
with
Developmental
Disabilities,"
Crime
and
Community,
Inc.
She
also
served
as
principal
consultant
to
the
Office
of
Human
Development
Services
Individual
Justice
Plan
(IJP)
Dissemination
Grant.
DeAnn
Hughes
is
project
Director,
IJP
Dissemination
Grant.
Eric
Evans
is
director,
Nebraska
Governor’s
Planning
Council
on
Developmental
Disabilities.
He
also
served
as
a
member
of
the
advisory
committee
to
the
IJP
Dissemina-
tion
Grant.
Introduction
Since
1980,
Nebraska
citizens
have
been
working
toward
implementation
of
the
Individual
Justice
Plan
(IJP),
a
model
re-
sponse
to
persons
who
have
the
following
characteristics
in
com-
mon :
the
presence
of
a
developmental
disability,
a
history
of
pri-
marily
nonviolent
behavior,
and
contact
or
the
risk
of
contact
with
the
criminal
justice
system.
The
model
emphasizes
the
use
of
the
least
restrictive
community-based
alternatives
to
incarceration
as
early
as
possible
in
the
criminal
justice
process
while
holding
individuals
accountable
for
their
behavior.
From
its
inception,
Crime
&
Community,
Inc.,
has
focused
attention
on
persons
without
violent
patterns
of
behavior.
The
rationale
for
this
was
twofold.
First,
the
majority
of
persons
held
in
both
jails
and
prisons
are
incarcerated
for
crimes
of
a
nonviolent
nature.
Current
statistics
from
the
National
Coalition
for
Jail
Reform
show
that
70
percent
of
jail
inmates
are
incarcerated
for
nonviolent
crimes.
The
Bureau
of
Justice
Statistics
reports
that
in
1982
nonviolent
offenders
accounted
for
62.5
percent
of
those
admitted
to
prison.
In
Nebraska,
this
admission
rate
was
70
per-
cent.
Second,
as
a
society,
we
have
not
yet
created
viable
strategies
to
deal
effectively
with
violent
offenders.
Clearly,
the
criminal
justice
system
has
the
primary
responsibility
to
protect
the
public
from
those
individuals
who
are
a
threat
to
the
safety
of
our
com-
munities.
However,
for
those
persons
whose
offenses
do
not
exhibit
a
violent
pattern,
there
are
better
ways
to
address
the
offending
behavior
than
jail or
prison.

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