Home Plate: A Celebration of the Polo Grounds.

 
FREE EXCERPT

"The iconic bathtub-shaped stadium served as home to the New York Giants baseball team (1891-1957), New York Yankees (1913-22), New York Giants football team (1925-55), and New York Mets (1962-63), as well as stints by several other professional teams and athletic events."

IN 1890, as New York continued to grow, the third incarnation of the Polo Grounds rose within the gaze of a historic mansion on former riverfront property where the Morris and Jumels families harvested oysters. "Home Plate: A Celebration of the Polo Grounds--The Birthplace of New York's Love Affair for Its Favorite Teams" is on view at the Morris-Jumel Mansion through Jan. 5,2020.

The iconic bathtub-shaped stadium served as home to the New York Giants baseball team (1891-1957), New York Yankees (1913-22), New York Giants football team (1925-55), and New York Mets (1962-63), as well as stints by several other professional teams and athletic events.

This property, which lies east of the Mansion, just below Coogan's Bluff, lays claim to a number of mark-these-down moments in American sports history, including the first home runs of Babe Ruth and Jackie Robinson; the death of Ray Chapman by way of an accidental beanball; Jack Dempsey's heavyweight boxing victory in 1923 over Luis Fir-po captured by the famous George Bellows painting; the Joe Louis-Billy Conn heavyweight bout in 1941; the 1908 "Merkle Incident" that helped the Chigago Cubs edge the Giants for the National League flag; and, of course, two of the most-memorable moments in the national pastime's long and storied history--the "Shot Heard 'Round the World" (aka The Miracle of Coogan's Bluff), when the Giants won the 1951 National League pennant in spectacular fashion on Bobby Thomson's three-run homer in the bottom of the ninth inning against the rival Brooklyn Dodgers; and Willie Mays' beyond-belief, over-the-shoulder catch in the opening game of the 1954 World Series in what turned out to be a four-game sweep of the Cleveland Indians.

Some 60 years after the Say-Hey Kid's incredible grab, the Giants, long since trans George Washington

Served-and Likely Slept-Here

The Morris-Jumel Mansion, constructed in 1765, is Manhattan's oldest residence. Through historic site tours and education programs, the nonprofit museum interprets the mansion in the context of domestic life in New York from 1765 until 1865. The Mansion serves visitors year-round through history, cultural, and arts programming.

The Mansion served as...

To continue reading

FREE SIGN UP