HOLLAND, KENNETH, and FRANK ERNEST HILL. Youth in the CCC. Pp. xv, 263. Washington: American Council on Edu cation, 1942. $2.25

AuthorStuart A. Queen
DOI10.1177/000271624222400175
Published date01 November 1942
Date01 November 1942
Subject MatterArticles
231
to
be
a
dramatic
popularization,
why
weaken
its
impact
by
beginning
with
three
pages
of
foreword
and
acknowledgments-
the
abracadabra
of
the
scholarly
thesis?
Finally,
if,
as
stated
on
page
99,
&dquo;planning
involves
all
branches
of
government,&dquo;
why,
in
the
pictorial
charts
of
the
organization
of
the
city
and
county
governments,
is
the
planning
agency
grouped
modestly
and
in-
conspicuously
with
road
commissioners
and
municipal
engineers
and
surveyors,
instead
of
being
where
it
should
be,
at
the
right
hand
of
the
governing
body
and
chief
ad-
ministrator
as a
staff
co-ordinating
agency?
CHARLES
S.
ASCHER
National
Housing
Agency
HOLLAND,
KENNETH,
and
FRANK
ERNEST
HILL.
Youth
in
the
CCC.
Pp.
xv,
263.
Washington:
American
Council
on
Edu-
cation,
1942.
$2.25.
From
1933
to
1941
about
2,750,000
youths
were
enrolled
in
the
Civilian
Con-
servation
Corps.
To
evaluate
the
pro-
gram,
a
five-year
study
was
sponsored
by
the
American
Youth
Commission
of
the
American
Council
on
Education.
The
staff
varied
from
20
to
120
persons,
who
visited
many
of
the
camps
to
survey
their
equipment,
personnel,
and
activities.
They
interviewed
officers
in
the
camps,
area
and
national
supervisors,
selection
agents,
parents,
and
employers
of
the
boys
after
their
return
home-all
these
in
addition
to
several
thousand
enrollees
themselves.
Besides
many
who
were
in-
terviewed
casually,
9,000
were
tested
sys-
tematically,
and
intensive
case
studies
were
made
of
419.
Finally,
an
experimental
grogram
was
tried
out
in
10
camps,
which
were
compared
with
10
&dquo;control&dquo;
camps.
The
book
which
has
resulted
is
not,
how-
ever,
a
research
monograph.
Instead
of
presenting
in
detail
the
methods
of
inquiry
and
the
evidence
assembled,
it
offers
the
findings
in
rather
general
terms
&dquo;for
the
large
body
of
educators,
and
for
the
so-
cially
minded
general
reader.&dquo;
The
three
major
purposes
of
the
CCC
were:
(1)
employment
for
young
men
coupled
with
relief
for
their
families,
(2)
conservation
of
soil
and
forest,
and
(3)
training
for
the
enrollees.
The
first
was
accomplished
insofar
as
funds
and
enroll-
ments
permitted.
There
was
real
achieve-
ment
in
the
conservation
program.
But
the
educational
program
left
much
to
be
desired.
Some
illiterates
were
taught
to
read.
Some
boys
made
up
deficiencies
in
common
school
subjects.
Most
of
them
received
good
training
on
the
job.
But
general
education,
both
vocational
and
avo-
cational,
was
often
poorly
planned
and
conducted.
In
the
fields
of
health
and
safety,
positive
results
were
attained.
In
religion,
morals,
and
citizenship,
there
was
little
evidence
of
change
in
the
boys.
Some
reasons
for
limited
success
in
the
CCC
were:
divided
authority,
personnel
unprepared
for
this
particular
assignment,
lack
of
a
general
philosophy,
and
absence
of
an
integrated
program
of
work,
training,
and
play.
The
book
is
simply
and
interestingly
written
and
well
illustrated.
It
offers
to
all
educators
and
citizens
with
open
minds
some
serious
challenges.
While
based
on
a
rather
elaborate
piece
of
research,
it
was
not
written
for
specialists
in
any
of
the
social
sciences.
STUART
A.
QUEEN
Washington
University
MCCONNELL,
JOHN
W.
The
Evolution
of
Social
Classes.
Pp.
x,
228.
Washington:
American
Council
on
Public
Affairs,
1942.
Paperbound:
$3.00;
Clothbound:
$3.50.
In
the
prefa.ce
the
author
calls
attention
to
the
vagueness
of
the
term
&dquo;class&dquo;
in
common
usage;
in
the
concluding
chapter,
entitled
&dquo;The
Theory
of
Social
Classes,&dquo;
he
classifies
the
varied
conceptions
of
class
among
the
social
scientists
as
psychological,
racial,
behavioristic,
environmental,
and
functional
theories,
and
briefly
summarizes
the
ideas
of
the
chief
exponents
of
each
viewpoint.
The
confusion
inherent
in
the
situation
he
attempts
to
repair
in
part.
While
eclectic
in
his
general
treatment,
the
definition
around
which
his
study
centers
places
him
primarily
in
the
category
of
the
functionalists.
By
&dquo;class&dquo;
he
mains
&dquo;a
group
of
persons
united
by
the
present
or
past
performance
of
a
function
essential
to
the
self-maintenance
of
the
society-
providing,
however,
that
the
performance
of
the
function
gives
to
the
group
a
set
of
life
conditions,
patterns
of
thought
and
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