A Heart Blown Open.

Author:Scott, Barbara Bamberger
Position:Book review

Keith Martin-Smith (author); A HEART BLOWN OPEN; Divine Arts Media (Nonfiction: Biography) 22.95 ISBN: 9781611250084

Byline: Barbara Bamberger Scott

"Kelly came back to the question again and again: what did it mean to be an American Zen Roshi nearing the twenty-first century?"

If Denis Kelly's life was made into a novel, no one would believe it, so the truth, told here as accurately as possible by author and fellow Zen Buddhist Keith Martin-Smith, must suffice: Kelly crossed every inner river, climbed every emotional mountain, slayed every psychological dragon, to arrive at a place of peacefulness.

Most of us imagine that a spiritual master would be a person of high moral integrity, likely celibate, and definitely vegetarian, someone who speaks in terse mysterious phrases and smiles a lot. Someone rather like the Dalai Lama, whom Kelly has met. Kelly had a habit, begun in grade school, of telling people in authority that what they said was "bullaa" and he didn't spare the Dalai Lama that assessment. The assertion generally resulted in shock and expulsion, but not in the case of the Dalai Lama, who just smiled and told Kelly that his spiritual insight wasn't deep enough yet. Oddly, it was his tendency to blow up at authority that led to Kelly's heart being blown open, and to his becoming a spiritual master himself.

Kelly grew up with an abusive alcoholic father who savagely beat his sons while his mother turned a blind eye. This gave the boy a hatred of men in authority and a mistrust of all women that took him years to overcome. The only saving grace in his youth was a memory from infancy, of finding solace in a "sense of pervasive peace a silence out of which everything arose." Because of that fleeting but seemingly endless...

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