GLOVER, T. R. The Challenge of the Greek and Other Essays. Pp. x, 241. Cam- bridge: At the University Press; New York: The Macmillan Co., 1942. $2.75

AuthorHans Kohn
DOI10.1177/000271624222400178
Published date01 November 1942
Date01 November 1942
Subject MatterArticles
233
free
trade,
Negro
emancipation,
and
other
reforms.
The
survival
of
these
humani-
tarian
interests
after
the
end
of
the
Revo-
lution
bears
evidence
to
the
influence
of
that
movement
on
Lafayette
in
his
im-
pressionable
youth.
He
had
in
fact
be-
come
a
liberal,
and,
in
so
doing,
the
ve-
hicle
for
carrying
the
American
Revolution
to
France.
The
author
maintains
that
though
the
French
Revolution
might
have
happened
without
Washington,
Franklin,
and
other
American
leaders,
it
came
when
it
did
and
in
its
characteristic
form
largely
because
of
them.
Educated
by
them,
La-
fayette
&dquo;appeared
on
the
French
scene,
marked
as
a
natural
leader,
just
at
the
moment
when
nebulous
hypotheses
were
ready
to
be
translated
into
plans
of
action.&dquo;
He
used
his
prestige
&dquo;to
make
France
American&dquo;
and
strove
to
keep
before
the
French
&dquo;a
concrete
example
of
’a
new
na-
tion
conceived
in
liberty
and
dedicated
to
the
proposition
that
all
men
are
created
equal.’
&dquo;
In
so
doing
he
provided
France
with
what
was
most
needed,
leadership
and
a
program.
The
author
anticipates,
in
his
preface,
his
next
milestone
in
the
major
project
of
the
life
of
Lafayette,
promising
subsequent
volumes
to
tell
the
story
of
how
Lafayette
passed
from
the
American
Revolution
and
success
to
the
French
Revolution
and
disas-
ter.
It
is
to
be
hoped
that
he
will
not
keep
his
audience
waiting
too
long.
VIOLA
F.
BARNES
Mount
Holyoke
College
GLOVER,
T.
R.
The
Challenge
of
the
Greek
and
Other
Essays.
Pp.
x,
241.
Cam-
bridge:
At
the
University
Press;
New
York:
The
Macmillan
Co.,
1942.
$2.75.
Professor
Glover,
for
many
years
teacher
of
Greek
at
Cambridge,
has
collected
in
this
volume
a
number
of
essays
written
during
recent
years.
They
cover
a
wide
field.
The
first
two
deal
with
the
subject
of
the
importance
of
classical
studies
and
their
place
in
education.
They
do
it
in
a
time
when
the
study
of
the
classics
is
widely
regarded
as
impractical,
as
leading
to
nowhere.
In
his
presidential
address
to
the
Classical
Association
in
1938,
Dr.
Glover
pointed
out
that
the
classics
have
been
losing
their
place
in
education
because
the
classicists
&dquo;have
tried
to
be
efficient
and
precise
and
scientific,
have
counted
the
part
above
the
whole,
have
found
their
center
in
details,
side
issues,
intricacies,
be-
cause
they
had
forgotten
that
they
were
training
men
and
citizens.&dquo;
What
Dr.
Glover
says
here
about
classical
studies
could
be
said
as
well
about
studies
in
the
humanities
and
in
the
social
sciences
as
well.
&dquo;We
have
not
believed
enough
in
the
classics,
nor
loved
them
enough,
nor
been
made
over
by
them.&dquo;
None
of
the
Geisteswissenschaften
can
prosper
if
its
teachers
forget
that
they
do
not
deal
with
&dquo;science&dquo;
but
with
life
and-education
for
life.
Dr.
Glover
does
not
forget.
As
a
result,
we
have
a
number
of
delightful
studies
which
bring
life
in
ancient
Greece
into
im-
mediate
contact
with
life
today
and
its
problems.
There
are
chapters
on
iced
water
and
gastronomy,
on
food
values
and
on
forestry,
on
roads
and
on
agriculture,
in
ancient
Greece,
always
set
in
parallel
to
our
times
and
to
the
problems,
especially
of
the
great
Canadian
Dominion,
which
Dr.
Glover
knows
so
well
and
loves
so
well.
The
book
ends
with
three
appraisals,
two
short
ones
of
Erasmus
and
Vergil,
and
a
longer
one
of
Homer
and
his
readers-
perhaps
the
most
rewarding
chapter
in
a
book
full
of
intimate
knowledge
and
mellow
grace.
HANS
KOHN
Smith
College
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