For The Love of It.

Author:Smedley, Lee
Position:Product/service evaluation
 
FREE EXCERPT

For The Love of It, Video, 2007, Star Thrower Distribution Corp., $695.

Support: leader guide, workbook, PowerPoint presentation.

The folks at Life is Good have made a killing on the theme of doing what you love and loving what you do. Dewitt Jones is on the bandwagon too.

He is, of course, the world-famous National Geographic photographer with a string of inspirational video programs to his credit. This time in For The Love of It, he applies his formula of breathtaking photos, easy-to-understand key points, and his casual conversational style to the topic of loving one's work.

For many, it will be a welcome respite from Dilbert comics, reruns of The Office or the quips of your resident office cynic.

The instructional package includes a 25-minute video, PowerPoint presentation, program transcript, leader's guide, and other support materials. It also includes a sample participant workbook and reminder cards, both of which can be purchased for use with the program.

The stated training focus is to help participants unite their vocation and avocation. Jones uses a line from the Robert Frost poem, "Two Tramps in Mud Time," as his inspiration for this theme.

The key concepts of the program are:

* Begin with a full cup.

* Find guides.

* Act as if.

* Express gratitude.

* Make a contribution.

* Pass it on.

* Chase the light.

The leader's guide includes a group activity for each of the key concepts and options, using some or all of the materials, for one-hour, two-hour, and half-day programs.

The topic of this program is an important one and the examples Jones shares to illustrate each key concept are memorable. Tales of a cowboy on Hawaii, a dejected group of corporate salesmen, the owner of multi-colored homing pigeons, and even Jones's stories about himself and his mother all draw attention to the joy and personal effectiveness that can come when we choose work that we love.

And, even in instances where we are not in the perfect job, Jones reminds us that we can still choose to love the work before us. The concept of personal accountability and choice has been addressed in many ways, but this version, that of choosing to love your work, is a valuable counterpoint to political maneuvering for career advancement or leveraging one's knowledge, skill, and experience to "get noticed."

While the content may be a bit...

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