Disaster and the divine.

Author:Price, Jonathan David
Position:Correspondence - Letter to the Editor
 
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David B. Hart has missed the mark with his short apologetic, "Tsunami and Theodicy" (March 2005). Not only does he wash his hands of the offense of evil in this world, but to avoid the implications of Providence, he also skips from answering the problem of evil to eschatological sentiments about Jesus wiping the tears from the eyes of Dostoyevsky's excrement-eating girl. The effect is unsatisfactory.

"Suffering and death, considered in themselves, have no ultimate meaning at all," Hart says. But only a Platonist could consider these things "in themselves." All suffering and death are part of a narrative--in fact, the Narrative. Without the story, they are nothing--like a hole in a shirt, without the shirt to surround it. And although they are in themselves nothing, and as such can benefit no one, when played out in the drama of Creation, Fall, and Redemption, they can facilitate goodness, beauty, and truth. Everywhere Easter emerges from Good Friday.

Hart is skeptical that others will profit from the demise of the tsunami victims. And certainly the benefit of others does not justify the evil of the loss. But won't others benefit? Aren't they already? Certainly acts of benevolence are now being visited on countries previously forgotten by the West. Food, shelter, care, medicine prayer, infrastructure-building, and hope are all being helicoptered into Asia and Africa. A megaphone has sounded for their blessing. No eternal harmony necessitated the tsunami suffering, but God can take the chromatic noise of suffering and make a melody.

And what about us? Hart says, "our position is charity," which is true. Charity is needed precisely because there is evil in the world. Provision must have been made within fallen Creation for us also to make melodies of the poor scales of suffering: to co-create goodness from them.

Naturally, Hart disagrees with Aquinas that all things will be justified in an ultimate synthesis, yet he never declares what will be done about all this suffering and death. If it has "no ultimate meaning," then nothing needs to be justified. However, if it has ultimate existential significance, and cannot with a clear conscience be reconciled with a good God, then what could be done ? Jesus can take away the girl's tears, but what about her former suffering? Hart never steps forward to answer this...

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