DEINOVE INITIATES PHASE II FOR DNV3837 CDI.

 
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DEINOVE is preparing the Phase II study that will test DNV3837, its most advanced antibiotic candidate, for use against Clostridium difficile infections (CDI). DEINOVE has chosen Medpace (NASDAQ: MEPD) to act as its CRO and to oversee the clinical trial scheduled to begin in 2019.

DNV3837 is a first-in-class antibiotic candidate targeting the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs), a disease classified as a priority by the WHO and one of the leading causes of healthcare-associated infections2. DNV3837 has demonstrated a promising efficacy profile and acceptable tolerance in Phase I trials. The FDA3 has already approved the start of a Phase II study and has granted the DNV3837 program the Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP) designation and Fast Track status4 for accelerated product development.

DEINOVE acquired the DNV3837 program in the 1st half of 2018. Since then, their clinical development team has worked with a group of healthcare experts in CDI to prepare for the start of a Phase II clinical trial whose purpose is to demonstrate the efficacy of DNV3837 in patients suffering from CDI. Several aspects of the trial design, which had been presented to the FDA prior to the acquisition, have been improved.

The design of the trial has now been finalized for submission of the updated version to the FDA. The selection process of clinical investigation centers is underway. The trial is scheduled to begin mid-year.

DEINOVE has chosen Medpace to oversee the trial. Medpace is an internationally-recognized full-service CRO that notably has a great deal of experience in infectious diseases, especially gastrointestinal infections like CDIs.

About Clostridium Difficile Infection

40% of patients suffering a Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) suffer from severe forms, with mortality rates as high as 50%. Over the past 20 years, CDIs have had a strong tendency to increase in incidence and severity, particularly due to the development of new, hyper virulent strains, and a high risk of recurrence. The US Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently identified CDIs as one of the leading causes of healthcare-associated infections before Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA6) infections. In 2011, about half a million Americans were infected and more than 29,000 patients died within 30 days of diagnosis.

The treatment of CDI represents a real therapeutic challenge.

To date, no effective antibiotic treatment is available for severe...

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