Counterterrorism and Economic Policy

Author:Lloyd J. Dumas
Position:University of Texas at Dallas
Pages:83-97
Counterterrorism and Economic Policy
Lloyd J. Dumas
I. INTRODUCTION : DEFINING TERRORISM ........................................... 83
II. TERRORISM AND CRIME .................................................................... 85
III. ADDRESSING THE UNDERLYING CAUSES : THE CONNECTION
BETWEEN TERRORISM AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ................... 87
IV. “AID VS. “TRADE AS MEANS FOR ENCOURAGING DEVEL OPMENT .. 89
A. Aid ............................................................................................... 90
1. The Importance of Context ..................................................... 90
2. The Value of Collaboration ..................................................... 91
3. Minimizing Resource Dive rsion ............................................. 92
B. Trade ........................................................................................... 93
V. ESTABLIS HING BALANCED, MUTUALLY BENEFICIAL TRADE
RELATIONSHIPS ................................................................................ 94
A. Micro-Lending ............................................................................. 94
B. Reducing Trade Barriers ............................................................ 95
VI. CON CLUSION ..................................................................................... 96
I. INTRODUCTION : DEFINING TERRORISM
In political speech, the word “terrorist” is often used to refer to someone
who uses violence to further a cause with which the speaker disagrees, while
“freedom fighter” is used to refer to someone who uses violence to further a
cause that the speaker considers more worthy. This may be effective political
rhetoric, but it will not help in understanding the phenomenon of terrorism
or, more importantly, developing policies to effectively counter it. For that, we
need a more precise and less subjective definition.
There are many definitions of terrorism extant.1 The U.S. Sta te
Department, while admitting that “[n]o one definition of terrorism has gained
universal acceptance,” 2 relies on the definition written into U.S. statutory
University of Texas at Dallas. (Pre pared for the Transnational Law and Contemporary
Problems symposium, “Ten Years after 9/11: Rethinking Counter-Terrorism”, University of Iowa,
Feb. 1011, 2011).
1 See, e.g., MARC MILLER & JASON FILE, TERRORISM FACTBOOK (2001).
2 U.S. DEPT OF STATE, PATTERNS OF GLOBAL TERRORISM, 2001 xvi (2002), available at
http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/10286.pdf.

To continue reading

FREE SIGN UP