COMPANY TREATS NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION WELLS.

 
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Integrated Environmental Technologies, Ltd. has commence ddown-hole well maintenance of natural gas wells for a new customer in the Uinta Basin in Utah using the Company's flagship Excelyte product. These down-hole operations consist of treating natural gas production wells that contain hydrogen sulfide, which is a toxic and corrosive chemical that frequently appears in oil and gas production. Excelyte acts as a hydrogen sulfide scavenger and as a biocide that kills sulfur-reducing bacteria, which are known to produce hydrogen sulfide. The company has successfully treated two wells, reducing the amount of hydrogen sulfide in each of the producing wells to a levelsignificantly better than accepted industry standards forsafe well operations. The company expects to continue treating those two wells, as well as commencing treatmenton approximately 150 other gas producing wells that the customer operates in the Uinta Basin.

David R. LaVance, the Company's President and Chief Executive Officer, commented, "I am very pleased that we have gained a new customer and commenced down-hole well maintenance treatments of gas wells. I believe that this application, along with the treatment of water used in hydraulic fracturing, represents a $50 million market opportunity for us in the Uinta Basin and potentially a$2.5 billion market opportunity in the United States. I am pleased to see Excelyte successfully address two large problems in gas production wells in an eco-friendly manner: elimination of bacteria and reduction of hydrogen sulfide. In the month of May, we expect three additional companies to conduct down-hole applications in Uinta Basin - the initial test market IET is using to demonstrate the product's efficacy in addressing complex geological issues underground."

Since gaining EPA approval, Excelyte has been used by select companies to treat processed water. The Uinta Basinwas identified as the starting point for operations due to two significant problems in the region's existing wells: persistence of...

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