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UTAH CCIM CHAPTER BOARD MEMBERS

To learn more about the value of working with a CCIM, call our Utah CCIM Chapter today at (801) 545-0246 or email admin@utahccimchapter.com

TUCKER, WHITE, CCIM

White Buffalo

President

RANDY ATKIN, CCIM

Colliers International

Golf Chair

JAMES MORRELL

Marcus & Millichap

MRED University

Outreach Co-Chair

JODY JONES, CCIM

Windermere

Secretary

STEVE KIEFFER

Big-D Construction

PR & Technology

Chair

SCOTTY PETTY

Mountain America

Credit Union

Membership Chair

WES CHRISTENSEN, CCIM

Marcus & Millichap

Secretary & Realcon Chair

JARED BOOTH, CCIM

Colliers International

Legislative Chair

HOLLY LITTLE

Utah CCIM Chapter

Executive Director

NATE HANKS, CCIM

RealSource

Treasurer

JONAH HORNSBY, CCIM

Windermere

Programs Co-Chair

KATIE WILKING

Berkshire Hathaway

Sponsorship

CHRIS CAHOON

Nuttera Partners

Website Chair

JOSH VANCE, CCIM

Mountain West Commercial

Past President/

Program Co-Chair

SCOTT SABEY

Fabian Van Cott

Forms Chair

MICHELLE DOONG, CCIM

Mountain West Commercial

Membership/Programs Chair

BRANDON DUKE, CCIM

KeyBank Real Estate Capital

Regional Vice President

MARY STREET, CCIM

Collier International

Scholarship/Continuing Education

PHIL BRIERLY

Marcus & Millichap

Realcon Chair

RONDA LANDA

First American Title

Excellence Awards

Chair

DANNY WALL, CCIM

University of Utah

MRED University

Outreach Chair

MATTHIAS KELLMER

ExtraSpace Storage

Programs Co-Chair

WHAT IS A CCIM? WHY USE A CCIM?

There are countless benefits to working with a CCIM. Commercial real estate investment requires the counsel of a qualified professional. A Certified Commercial Investment Member provides clients with the assurance that every decision will be made in the best interest of their investment objectives.

When assembling a commercial real estate investment team, start with a CCIM.

CCIM OF THE YEAR

2019 AWARD RECIPIENT

JAN WILKING, CCIM

BERKSHIRE

Jan Wilking is a skilled entrepreneur, community leader and real estate investor with deep roots in the Park City business community. Jan has successfully invested in Park City real estate for 38 years, with his first commercial property purchase on Main Street in 1975. Jan's Bachelor's and Master's Degrees in Architecture gave him the skills to renovate local historic buildings, develop residential and business condominiums, and consult on large scale real estate developments. Jan founded or owned several iconic Park City businesses, such as The Park Record newspaper, Park City Magazine and parkcity.com. These businesses thrived for decades under Jan's skillful management. His involvement with them has also given him the opportunity to interact with the owners of almost every other business in Park City. Jan earned the prestigious Certified Commercial Investment Member (CCIM) designation in early 2010 and regularly participates in symposiums webinars and conferences.

A MAN ON A MISSION

MEET THIS YEAR'S UTAH CCIM HALL OF FAME WINNER DELL LOY HANSEN

HALL OF FAME

DELL LOY HANSEN

WASATCH COMMERCIAL MANAGEMENT INC.

In high school, Dell Loy Hansen came across a book that would come to define his life's work. It was Marcus Aurelius' Meditations--what many consider the central teachings of stoic philosphy--that helped Mr. Hansen understand that life wasn't about trying to achieve some reward in heaven, it was about trying to do some good here on earth.

After a period of self-examination, Mr. Hansen folded those teachings into his life, vowing to help whoever he could, however he could. To be the good Samaritan. "If someone is in your path who needs help," he says, "just do it." That is our only option. He has since read Meditations more than twenty times.

Building (A Career) From The Ground Up

In college, Mr. Hansen wasn't sure how those tenets of stoicism would apply to his career. At first, he thought he might become a lawyer, but life intervened when a friend asked if him if he might help sell Farmers Administration Homes. Though he knew nothing about homes, he quickly learned the business from the ground up, building 28 homes during his college years.

By this point, Mr. Hansen as already well imbibed in the importance of hard work. His father, a World War II veteran and a product of the Great Depression, always taught his son the value of capital ism and conservation. To this day, his father regrets he didn't teach his son to play, "I never knew you could buy a bike from a store," Mr. Hansen says, "I was brought up thinking you went to the dump, found some spare parts, and built a bike yourself."

Mr. Hansen is not regretful for his childhood, rather he credits it with the person he became. Soon after, his success with Farmers Administration Homes took him away from college, and he spent a number of years working in real estate before returning to school to complete his education and purchase a home for himself. But that was only the beginning.

The Challenges That Define (An Individual)

Mr. Hansen went on to spend 23 years in the industry, eventually founding his own real estate development company, the Wasatch Group, where he currently resides as CEO. But it wasn't the experience, that led to his success. As is often the case, it was the challenges he faced, that strengthened Mr. Hansen's character.

One such challenge was a residential project in Bellevue, Washington. A developer there needed help, so Mr. Hansen stepped in with the help of a bank and an investor, purchasing 60 percent of the project. A year later, the owner had passed away, leaving 100 percent of the company in Mr. Hansen's hands.

He had 48 months to build 960 condominiums, so he worked in Logan Monday and Friday and spent every Tuesday through Thursday in Bellevue. It was a lot of work, and it took him 14 years to sell the final unit, but his condominium project was the only one that did not fail the banker during the Great Recession. Despite the challenges, Mr. Hansen and his team met every financial obligation.

The Successes That Pave The Way

Mr. Hansen went on to further double down on his mission. And that meant focusing on those projects most impactful to his community. "Building another apartment building isn't interesting to me," he says, "I want to build things that change the direction we're going societally."

That mindset led to the creation of a number of mixed-use developments across the state. "We're going back to villages," he says. "We're building villages.

These villages are self-sustaining, environmentally conscious communities that combine commercial space for offices, restaurants, and retails establishments; with residential space for housing, yoga studios, massage parlors, and other lifestyle amenities. These communities are walkable--residents never need to get in their cars-and they have their own power facilities, use no fossil fuels, and feature ample electric vehicle charging stations.

"We can't afford more carbon in our atmosphere," Mr. Hansen says. "If our population is supposed to double, then we need to change the way we develop for that population. We do not want to become the next Beijing."

The best way to do that, he says, is to track everything. "At every facility, we measure water, power, and trash, and we charge for it. As a result, we have saved millions of gallons of water by measuring water usage and charging for it."

Championing A Cause

Further improving on this ethos led Mr. Hansen to pursue a set of sports-centric developments designed to advance athletic achievement, gender equality, and sustainability. The Sports Academy in Logan was one of the first. "They told me it was oversized for the town it was in," Mr. Hansen says. "But it was a personal dream of mine."

Mr. Hansen had grown up playing tennis in Logan and was all too aware of the leg-up kids from Salt Lake City had. They wore matching uniforms, had multiple rackets, and even had bags their rackets zipped into. As an adult, Mr. Hansen wanted kids in Logan to be able to have the same opportunity, to get the same training and have access to the same resources.

So he built Sports Adacemy. Though he was told the facility couldn't sustain more than 800 members, the town grew to fit the center. Sports Academy now boasts more than 6,000 members, and its tennis program has trained every one of Mr. Hansen's daughters.

Then in 2013, Mr. Hansen became the owner of Real Salt Lake-Utah's professional soccer franchise. But he did so with the intention of championing women's equality in sports. "What the men got, the women got," he says. "Facilities are the same, pay is the same, and we will continue to push for that. Because little girls come to see these talented women and realize they can be anything men can be. And working together is what makes us the most productive country on Earth."

Leaving A Legacy

Though Mr. Hansen has experienced a lot of success in his career, he's quick to shine the spotlight back on his partners. "The mindset is not, 'I own 100 percent of this, so somehow it's mine to go out and buy a big house and a big boat with.' That is not a good way to look at it."

Instead, Mr. Hansen and his team have come up with a way to share the wealth with the people who helped build it. "Capitalism is a great way to make money," he says, "but it doesn't share well. We have to come up with a capitalism that works better for the people who are working in the business, the ones who clean the apartments, and make sure they run well."

That's why Mr. Hansen and his team have created democracy. One that is not top-down, but that allows employees to own equity in their projects. "No one gets there alone," Mr. Hansen says, "I don't own things alone, so everything I'm part of is all about partnerships and sharing. I don't have employees, I have a lot of partners."

Some of Mr. Hansen's partners are his own children. Nine out of 10 of them work inside his businesses. It's for them that he has created something that will outlast him. Something that harkens back to the tenets he learned early on from Marcus...

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