CANADA-UNITED STATES LAW INSTITUTE JOINT LAW-BUSINESS CASE STUDY COMPETITION PROGRAM.

TABLE OF CONTENTS Table of Contents I. Case Competition Description A. Statement of Purpose B. Competition Summary C. Competition Background D. Competition Details II. Case Framework Business Background. A. Canadian Entity B. United States Entity III. Evaluator Materials IV. Negotiation Preparation A. Planning For Your Negotiation B. Conducting the Negotiation V. Negotiation Instructions A. RedVue, Inc.: Confidential Materials B. Major Motors Corp.: Confidential Materials I. CASE COMPETITION DESCRIPTION

  1. Statement of Purpose

    Following the termination of the Niagara International Moot Court Competition in 2015 due to declining interest, a Joint Law-Business Case Study Competition was inaugurated in 2016. This project provides the Canada-United States Law Institute ("CUSLI") and its supporting institutions with a unique student competition experience that allows for continued student exchange and participation, as well as the growth of interdisciplinary learning. Hosting the competition in conjunction with the CUSLI Annual Conference also increases CUSLI's academic presence to its many practitioner constituents, which is beneficial both to CUSLI Conference attendees (who consistently request greater student involvement) and students from participating schools (who are often underrepresented and benefit from its networking opportunity). As the centerpiece of the competition the students are our participants and partners; we hope that they will learn from this innovative program and contribute to its current and future success.

  2. Competition Summary

    Concept'. This is an interdisciplinary case study competition that will bring together students from graduate law and business faculties to jointly problem-solve a given real-world issue.

    Case: The case presents two companies (one American, one Canadian) looking to achieve a mutually beneficial business transaction.

    Teams: Each company will be represented by interdisciplinary teams of four (4), consisting of two (2) Law and two (2) Business graduate students.

    Format: The competition will have three general phases: negotiation preparation, negotiation practice, and negotiation agreement submission.

    Assessment: Teams will be measured according to their ability to successfully navigate the complexities of a transactional situation. This will require advocating for their company's priorities while at the same time acknowledging the need for compromise with their negotiation counterparts to create an agreement acceptable to both parties.

    Prize'. The team that is found to have most successfully accomplished the above goals will be awarded a prize valued at $400 (shared equally among the team's four participants).

  3. Competition Background

    General Concept'. This project was proposed by Dean Ken Jones of Ryerson University School of Business at CUSLI's 2015 Executive Committee meeting. He proposed that CUSLI launch a law-business case study competition that will bring together students from graduate law and business faculties at participating schools to jointly problem-solve a given real-world issue. The problem will be a transactional situation requiring negotiation teams to move forward a proposed business deal.

    Case Competition Model: The case format is not new since it has been used for many years in business schools, analogous to the way that Moot Court competitions function in the law school setting. In the business case model, students are placed in teams of two to four students and are given a fact pattern to consider. After discussion and planning, the teams then present their findings and recommendations to a panel of experts in the given field. The experts then rank teams based on their work product and presentation, and give constructive feedback.

    Law-Business Case Competition'. While the case model is common in business schools, a joint case model bringing together Law and Business graduate students responding to both business and law cases is a new concept. The case competition model will be modified in this instance to incorporate some elements of the law school Moot Court model, specifically the team vs. team aspect. However, unlike the traditionally adversarial Moot Court model, this case competition will recreate a transactional situation, with both sides trying to "win" by creating a mutually valuable agreement, rather than "win" through legal argumentation. Importantly, this exercise will require Business and Law students to work together as partners to build an information picture, define priorities, and come up with workable strategies that are sound from both a business and legal perspective.

  4. Competition Details

    The CUSLI Joint Law-Business Case Competition coincided with the opening of 2018's 42nd Anniversary CUSLI Conference on April 12th, 2018. The participating Law and Business graduate students were the centerpiece of this process. The competition featured teams of graduate Law and Business students from University of Buffalo Law School and the University of Windsor Faculty of Law. The following are the core pieces of the competition's form and substance.

    * The Teams', each team was composed of two (2) law and two (2) business students).

    * The Case'. The case presented two companies (one American, one Canadian) looking to achieve a mutually beneficial business transaction. Each team, representing one company received a fact pattern detailing each business, negotiation instructions describing the proposed deal's background and requirements from company leadership, and a template agreement for teams to use as a model for their final product.

    * Competition Format

    ** Negotiation Preparation'. Teams received their materials approximately one month before the competition. Students were expected to carry out background legal and business research to inform their negotiation positions, and meet to discuss proposed strategy. Each team, representing one company as its negotiation team, had to determine the company's desired outcomes and negotiation strategy. Preparation was estimated to require eight to ten hours.

    ** Negotiation Practice'. Teams were then assigned a negotiation counterpart, with whom they would engage in negotiations to hopefully come to an agreement. Students were given an allotted time on April 12th, of no more than one hour and a half, to negotiate and come up with a proposed agreement.

    ** Agreement Draft/Recommendation: Out of the negotiations, teams created a proposed agreement, along with recommendations to corporate leadership as to whether the proposed agreement was acceptable, and if not, what further changes could be possible to make them so. Importantly, it was not an absolute necessity to come to an agreement; if there were insurmountable business and legal hurdles for a particular party, it was the team's responsibility to identify and communicate this possibility to company leadership.

    * Assessment: Teams were measured according to their ability to successfully navigate the complexities of the transactional situation, advocating for their company's priorities while at the same time acknowledging the need for compromise with their negotiation counterparts to create an agreement acceptable to both parties. Teams were not measured solely on their ability to extract "wins" on every desired business/legal goal, nor were they measured by the mere existence or absence of a proposed agreement at the conclusion of negotiations. The team that was found to have most successfully accomplished the above goals--from the University of Windsor Faculty of Law--was be awarded a prize valued at $400 (shared equally among the team's participants).

    1. CASE FRAMEWORK BUSINESS BACKGROUND

  5. Canadian Entity

    Business Name--RedVue Inc. (RVI), based in Waterloo, ON.

    Business Overview--An established Canadian tech company, RVI is a mobile device hardware and software development and manufacturing company.

    Market Participation--Started as a mobile device company, RVI continues to produce mobile devices and software primarily for the general consumer marker. RVI has recently re-focused its mobile device software unit, developing innovative software and hardware for interfacing mobile devices and emerging accessories like wearable tech and smarthome applications.

    Business Profile--Started in the mid-1990's, RVI first built a reputation for innovative and reliable mobile device hardware and software in the early years of the smartphone era. While RVI has in many ways been eclipsed by major mobile device makers like Samsung and Apple, RVI maintains a reputation for reliable devices and software. In particular, RVI has consistently shown an ability to create systems with greater security resilience in both its hardware and...

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