Airline News - Europe.

 
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New York, Geneva (AirGuide - Airline News Europe) May 29, 2011

Air France Air France black boxes suggest crash was caused by pilot error. The data recorders from the Air France jet that crashed nearly two years ago into the Atlantic Ocean indicate that the pilots had become distracted with issues related to airspeed indicators, according to sources. The pilots failed to adjust the engine thrust and deal with other vital systems. May 25, 2011

Air France Air France black boxes suggest crash was caused by pilot error. The data recorders from the Air France jet that crashed nearly two years ago into the Atlantic Ocean indicate that the pilots had become distracted with issues related to airspeed indicators, according to sources. The pilots failed to adjust the engine thrust and deal with other vital systems May 25, 2011

Air France, Airbus Black box puts spotlight on pilots as computers play bigger role. Air France Flight 447 crashed into the Atlantic Ocean nearly two years ago, but the plane's data recorders were only recently recovered and are now being analyzed. The situation has brought increased attention on the ability of pilots to avert disaster at a time when computers control much of what happens in the cockpit. "Sometimes, the man-machine interface can introduce problems itself," said Paul Hayes, director of safety at the aviation data and advisory firm Ascend Worldwide Ltd. "It may cure 70 percent of problems, but then add a few more." May 27, 2011

Croatia Airlines Croatia Airlines reinstated thrice-weekly Zagreb-Istanbul Ataturk A319 service, 12 years after it last operated the route. May 23, 2011

CSA Czech Airlines CSA Czech Airlines will launch Bratislava service to Barcelona (twice-weekly), Brussels (thrice-weekly), Larnaca (thrice-weekly), Amsterdam (four-times-weekly), Rome Fiumicino (five-times-weekly) and Paris Charles de Gaulle (seven-times-weekly) in June. May 23, 2011

EasyJet British budget airline easyJet is preparing to test a volcanic ash detection system on a research aircraft, it says. The airline is hoping to try out its ash detection system -- called the Airborne Volcanic Object Identifier and Detector (AVOID) -- by flying a test aircraft through ash blasted into the atmosphere from the Grimsvotn volcano on Iceland that erupted on Saturday, disrupting hundreds of commercial flights. AVOID uses infrared camera technology to detect ash in the atmosphere up to 100 km (62 miles) away says Fred Prata of the Norwegian...

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