ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Published date01 November 2005
DOIhttp://doi.org/10.3162/036298005779702663
Date01 November 2005
635About the Authors
LEGISLATIVE STUDIES QUARTERLY, XXX, 4, November 2005 635
ABOUT THE AUTHORS
Rudy B. Andeweg is Professor of Political Science at Leiden University. He
received his Ph.D. from Leiden University. Andeweg’s publications include
The Governance and Politics of the Netherlands, 2d. ed. (with G.A. Irwin)
(Palgrave Macmillan 2005) and “Consociational Democracy” (Annual Review
of Political Science 2000). His current areas of research are political
representation, legislative behavior, and political psychology.
Brandon L. Bartels is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Political Science
and a past Methods Fellow in the Program in Statistics and Methodology
(PRISM) at The Ohio State University. He has research interests in courts and
judicial politics, legislative politics, public opinion, and political methodology.
Janet M. Box-Steffensmeier is the Vernal Riffe Professor of Political Science
and Professor of Sociology and Director of the Program in Statistics and
Methodology (PRISM) at The Ohio State University. She received her Ph.D.
from the University of Texas at Austin in 1993. Her areas of research include
legislative politics, public opinion, and political methodology. She is co-author
of Event History Modeling: A Guide for Social Scientists (Cambridge
University Press 2004).
James N. Druckman is Associate Professor of Political Science and an AT&T
Research Scholar at Northwestern University. He received his Ph.D. from the
University of California, San Diego in 1999. Druckman’s recent co-authored
publications include “Framing and Deliberation: How Citizens’ Conversations
Limit Elite Influence” (with Kjersten R. Nelson) (American Journal of Political
Science 2003) and “Portfolio Salience and the Proportionality of Payoffs in
Coalition Governments” (with Paul V. Warwick) (British Journal of Political
Science 2001).
Eric S. Heberlig is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of
North Carolina, Charlotte. He received his Ph.D. from The Ohio State
University in 1997. Heberlig’s research areas include congressional and interest
group politics.

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