2006 national book critics circle.

Position:Awards

The National Book Critics Circle, founded in 1974, is a nonprofit organization consisting of nearly 700 active book reviewers. The winners from the nominees below will be announced on March 8, 2007.

Fiction

HALF OF A YELLOW SUN | CHIMAMANDA NGOZI ADICHIE: In 1967 the Igbo people of eastern Nigeria broke away from their country to form the nation of Biafra. The author relates this history through three individuals that reflect the region's tumult and violence. (EXCELLENT/CLASSIC Nov/Dec 2006)

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"This book confirms the notion that if you want to understand a country's past, certainly you should read historical and economic texts. If you want to understand its soul, however, read its fiction." MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE

THE INHERITANCE OF LOSS | KIRAN DESAI: * BOOKER PRIZE. In 1980s India, in a small community at the Himalayas foothills and Nepalese border, political unrest threatens the calm of a retired judge, his cook, and his orphaned teenage granddaughter. (EXCELLENT SELECTION Mar/Apr 2006)

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"Without heroes or villains, she gives us a stunningly wide cast of believable people, each with a compelling story, all of them beautifully told." HARTFORD COURANT

WHAT IS THE WHAT | DAVE EGGERS: Valentino Achak Deng survived a 1,000-mile exodus during the Sudanese civil war of the 1980s and 1990s. Even after great suffering there and in the United States, he never relinquished hope. (EXCELLENT Jan/Feb 2007)

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"[A] book with the imaginative sweep, the scope and, above all, the emotional power of an epic." NEW YORK TIMES

THE LAY OF THE LAND | RICHARD FORD: The third and final Frank Bascombe novel (after The Sportswriter and Independence Day) finds the 55-year-old New Jersey real estate salesman in the midst of a personal crisis. (GOOD Jan/Feb 2007)

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"There's much too much of America to fit into a novel ... even for a writer who can be as preternaturally pretty on the page as Ford." NEWSDAY

THE ROAD | CORMAC MCCARTHY: In this morality play, an unnamed man and his young son travel through a post-apocalyptic world, where starvation and unnamed violence threaten their very survival. (EXCELLENT/CLASSIC Nov/Dec 2006)

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"Here he proves he can strip his fiction down to its most essential elements." DENVER POST

Nonfiction

THE OCCUPATION War and Resistance in Iraq | PATRICK COCKBURN: The author, a Middle East correspondent for the Independent, reports on the...

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