Prison Journal, The

Publisher:
Sage Publications, Inc.
Publication date:
2021-09-06
ISBN:
0032-8855

Latest documents

  • Can Rehabilitation Work in Military Prison? A Theoretical Framework Based on the Israeli Case

    Israel's military prisons operate a rehabilitation program for imprisoned soldiers based on a psychosocial diagnosis. The program's essential aim is to help soldiers complete their service and avoid re-incarceration. This article describes the program, its function related to the integrative law court, and its role as the army's probation service. It further presents a unique perspective regarding military rehabilitation programs, demonstrating how rehabilitation leads to recidivism. It concludes with a recommendation for incorporating an organizational change in the program that involves redistributing the existing sections to operate under two different authorities.

  • Can Rehabilitation Work in Military Prison? A Theoretical Framework Based on the Israeli Case

    Israel's military prisons operate a rehabilitation program for imprisoned soldiers based on a psychosocial diagnosis. The program's essential aim is to help soldiers complete their service and avoid re-incarceration. This article describes the program, its function related to the integrative law court, and its role as the army's probation service. It further presents a unique perspective regarding military rehabilitation programs, demonstrating how rehabilitation leads to recidivism. It concludes with a recommendation for incorporating an organizational change in the program that involves redistributing the existing sections to operate under two different authorities.

  • A Symposium to Mark the Publication, by New York University Press, of Ian O’Donnell's Prison Life: Pain, Resistance, and Purpose

    Recognizing the major scholarly contributions to criminology by the noted Irish criminologist, Ian O’Donnell, The Prison Journal invited seven contemporary corrections and punishment scholars to offer insights into O’Donnell’s new book, Prison Life: Pain, Resistance, and Purpose. Offering contextually rich descriptions of prisoner life, the text features four case study prisons—H Blocks, Northern Ireland; Eastham Unit, Texas; Isir Bet, Ethiopia; and ADX Florence, Colorado, in pivotal time periods and through an individual's custodial career in each institution. The symposium discussants focus on O’Donnell's conceptual framework—the degree of prison integration, system and staff regulation, and legitimacy—and how these reflect the key interactions between punishment and society across time and culture.

  • A Symposium to Mark the Publication, by New York University Press, of Ian O’Donnell's Prison Life: Pain, Resistance, and Purpose

    Recognizing the major scholarly contributions to criminology by the noted Irish criminologist, Ian O’Donnell, The Prison Journal invited seven contemporary corrections and punishment scholars to offer insights into O’Donnell’s new book, Prison Life: Pain, Resistance, and Purpose. Offering contextually rich descriptions of prisoner life, the text features four case study prisons—H Blocks, Northern Ireland; Eastham Unit, Texas; Isir Bet, Ethiopia; and ADX Florence, Colorado, in pivotal time periods and through an individual's custodial career in each institution. The symposium discussants focus on O’Donnell's conceptual framework—the degree of prison integration, system and staff regulation, and legitimacy—and how these reflect the key interactions between punishment and society across time and culture.

  • Canadian Prison Environments: A Mixed Methods Analysis

    The current study uses a mixed methods approach to assess quality of prison life in Canada's Atlantic provincial correctional institutions. Questions from the Measurement of the Quality of Prison Life were adapted to create scales to assess prisoner climate dimension perceptions, with open-ended questions providing qualitative data. Across eight prison sites, statistical analysis revealed between prison differences and confirmed that prison sentence location did matter. The qualitative data emergent themes also produced several consistent concerns that Likert responses could not capture, ranging from primary needs to service desires. Research affirms the importance of studying prison environments and supports the use of mixed methods, as qualitative data can provide greater insight into the lived experience of inmates and better chart change that is beneficial to them.

  • Canadian Prison Environments: A Mixed Methods Analysis

    The current study uses a mixed methods approach to assess quality of prison life in Canada's Atlantic provincial correctional institutions. Questions from the Measurement of the Quality of Prison Life were adapted to create scales to assess prisoner climate dimension perceptions, with open-ended questions providing qualitative data. Across eight prison sites, statistical analysis revealed between prison differences and confirmed that prison sentence location did matter. The qualitative data emergent themes also produced several consistent concerns that Likert responses could not capture, ranging from primary needs to service desires. Research affirms the importance of studying prison environments and supports the use of mixed methods, as qualitative data can provide greater insight into the lived experience of inmates and better chart change that is beneficial to them.

  • Through Hope and Struggle: The Impact of “Gaisce – The President's Award” on Young Adults in Irish Prisons

    This article is an exploratory study of young adult incarcerees’ perspectives on the impact of “Gaisce,” a self-development program for youth in Irish custody. Drawing on 10 semistructured interviews with male participants and a review of previous studies of this cohort, the article highlights their perceptions of Gaisce's strengths and weaknesses, paving the way for further reflection on self-development programs in custodial settings. Taking place during COVID-19, the investigation provides unique insight into the experiences of young adults participating in such a program during a pandemic.

  • Through Hope and Struggle: The Impact of “Gaisce – The President's Award” on Young Adults in Irish Prisons

    This article is an exploratory study of young adult incarcerees’ perspectives on the impact of “Gaisce,” a self-development program for youth in Irish custody. Drawing on 10 semistructured interviews with male participants and a review of previous studies of this cohort, the article highlights their perceptions of Gaisce's strengths and weaknesses, paving the way for further reflection on self-development programs in custodial settings. Taking place during COVID-19, the investigation provides unique insight into the experiences of young adults participating in such a program during a pandemic.

  • Retiring in a Prison Cell: The South African Sentenced Older Adult Male Offender

    The purpose of this study was to create a profile of the sentenced older adult male offender incarcerated in South African prisons. The findings of this investigation are based on face-to-face surveys with 88 older adult male inmates. In order to develop a comprehensive profile, the study explored offenders’ backgrounds, previous and current offenses, lifestyle patterns, physical and mental health, institutional living conditions, release, reintegration, and mortality in prison. These domains are discussed in detail, and recommendations are offered for the treatment and care of this offender group. The recommendations may be applicable to other developing countries in the Global South.

  • Understanding and Preventing Ideologically Justified Violence in Custodial Settings: The MICO Paradigm

    Internationally, secure institutions face a range of challenges presented by detainees convicted or suspected of terrorism-related crimes and those interested or involved in groups that support ideologically justify violence (IJV). Currently, there is an apparent absence of a theoretically grounded but operationally focused paradigm (or conceptual lens) for understanding and preventing IJV within such settings. In response, this article presents such a paradigm, to inform and direct the implementation of coherent organizational policies and practices to address this issue. The paradigm, its theoretical basis, its implications for correctional policy and practice, and limitations are outlined and discussed.

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